Lodging News - October 2011

Vijay Patel

Navigating the Loan Maze

One of the most frequently cited challenges in today’s lodging community is the financing of new projects, acquisitions and expansions. ORLA recently spoke with a few members on this issue and found a common theme, “it’s a complicated process”. Three Oregon hoteliers shared their own experiences and advice on trying to obtain financing for projects during this “great recession.”

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Fiscal Food Management

Fiscal Food Management

Businesses that incorporate sustainable practices benefit with increased financial success. This was illustrated during the economic downturn in 2008–2009, when businesses committed to sustainability financially outperformed industry averages by 15 percent. Sustainable practices in lodging and hospitality have traditionally translated to energy and water efficiency as well as waste reduction, for the rooms and conference space.

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Expensive Drainage

Expensive Drainage

The City of Portland spends more than $12 million a year to clean and repair sewer lines clogged by FOG (fats, oil and grease), and to treat wastewater containing high concentrations of food waste. Currently, 72 commercial sewer customers pay an additional fee, but the city has identified more than 2,000 establishments, including hotels with full service restaurants and/or banquet kitchens, that discharge concentrated FOG and food waste in their sewage.

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Pet Policies

Pet Policies

While many hotels are embracing dogs as their new furry guests, many properties choose not to allow pets on their property. ORLA has been fielding a number of questions from providers lately on what they can and cannot ask guests in determining whether to allow dogs on property. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has published some new regulations that may help clarify your rights as a lodging provider.

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Managing Risk

Managing Risks

If your property provides food and beverage or special events such as weddings, you probably have a keg or two on hand. Not only is beer from a keg convenient, but the cost per ounce is considerably less than beer from a bottle, which is a benefit to you, as well as to your customers. However, don’t be fooled that it is all good. Your establishment may be ringing up hidden costs associated with keg use.

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